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Showing posts from July, 2015

Video for learning and engagement

By Sara Langworthy

Online video is ubiquitous for watching and sharing content – especially for young people. In fact, many youth are watching more free online video content (11.3 hours per week) than traditional TV (8.3 hours per week). A recent survey by Defy Media suggests that younger viewers find YouTube content more entertaining than traditional TV shows and they are more likely to view YouTube creators as role models than TV stars.

How to make impactful summer learning experiences

By Carrie Ann Olson

The summer schedule for young people can be full of adventure, curiosity and exploration. On the other hand, the lack of structure can cause boredom and lack of motivation. Youth practitioners may find it hard to come up with appealing activities non-formal learning environments that foster education and career success, healthy relationships and engaged citizenship.

Online activism, a forum for 21st century giving

By Trudy Dunham

Did you add a rainbow to your Facebook profile photo last week?  Did you think twice before making your decision? Was it a risky choice for you? Did you think of it as a meaningful action?

Following the Supreme Court decision on June 26 that same-sex marriage is a constitutional right, more than a million Facebook users changed their profile images in celebration.

Youth programs need bricoleurs (that's you)

By Pamela Larson Nippolt

Today, youth workers are expected to be social innovators. Francis Westley teaches us about the place for bricolage in designing innovative programs that address critical issues facing youth. Bricolage is the “DIY” of program design or, as defined by Merriam-Webster dictionary, “construction (as of a sculpture or a structure of ideas) achieved by using whatever comes to hand; also something constructed in this way.”